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 What to Consider When Purchasing Your Whirly Jig

1. Does the rotisserie you are planning to buy or are presently using require a reduction             gear for easy rotation?
2.  Does it require nylon sliders or rollers to raise or lower?
3.  Does it require stabilizers to keep it from wobbling or shifting?
4.  Does it have a sudden shift of weight halfway through rotation?
5.  Does it require more than one rotisserie to have 
     (a) a stationary unit where bases are not tied together, 
     (b) a mobile unit on hard casters, or 
     (c) a mobile unit on 2 or 4 pneumatic wheels and tires?
6.  Is it basically 2 engine stands requiring the body to hold the rotisserie together?
7.  Does the rated capacity of the rotisserie exceed the rated capacity of the casters or               tires supporting it?
8.  Will the rotisserie fall over if the base ties are removed?
9.  Does it weigh over 500 lbs., requiring 2 men and an engine hoist to assemble?
10.  Can 1 person move it with ease in any direction?

 

All Whirly Jigs® are painted, lubricated and assembled for you.  They come with a 30-page instruction manual, 1 hour instruction video and 24 hours a 7 day a week technical assistance by phone.

 There are thousands of small welding shops around the country; any one of them can build you a car body rotator. One such welding shop will build you anything from a windmill to a snowplow.

We are an auto body rotisserie manufacturer. We build only the Whirly Jig® Auto Body Rotisserie. When you build only one product, it has to be the best. Our livelihood depends on it.

In an attempt to assure no one puts their restoration project on a poorly designed or dangerous rotisserie, we will explain the difference between a good rotisserie and a bad one.

 

ENGINE STAND TYPE ROTISSERIES

Use only with solid bodies when no sheet metal replacement is necessary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


This type of rotisserie requires the car body to keep the rotisserie bases both upright and parallel. All the pressure is on the car body to keep the rotisserie together. This system gives the car body absolutely no support. The car body controls the rotisserie.

THE SINGLE BASE TIE SYSTEM ROTISSERIE

EXAMPLES BELOW:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


This type of rotisserie requires the car keeps the bases parallel. Again, the body controls the rotisserie. In some cases, when the base tie disconnects, the whole system collapses. This is not a very desirable feature.


THE TWO BASE TIE SYSTEM ROTISSERIE

EXAMPLES BELOW:

The rotisserie bases are kept parallel by the two base ties at the outside perimeter. The body has been relieved of these pressures. The base ties of the Whirly Jig® can be removed at any time and used as a stationary model, leaving the area under the car completely unobstructed for dismantling.

 

 

BRACKET SYSTEMS, JAM BOLT

EXAMPLES BELOW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHIRLY JIG'S BRACKET SYSTEMS, INTERNAL COMPRESSION CAPTIVE SLOT

EXAMPLES BELOW

 

This system is used only by Whirly Jig®, both on brackets and center post to base. Center post to base clamp also has a 5-position safety bolt height adjustment. Internal compression captive slot system eliminates any possibility of collapsing the tubing due to repeated or over-tightening.

If you go through the many rotisserie web sites, you will see what appears to be the normal leaning of the bases and brackets when a load is applied, and even with no load at all. This is a sure sign of a poorly designed rotisserie. On their Bottoms Up models, the Johnson City/Jonesborough rotisserie company moves the wheels toward the body to (in their own words) "keep the bases from leaning toward the body when loaded." This is not a good idea as the bearings of the swivel casters must always be parallel to the surface they ride on in order to change direction easily. This is using the weight of the body to straighten the bases. HOW MUCH IS NECESSARY???????

EXAMPLES BELOW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These tripods will "hammock" your car!

 

 

ROTATING AXIS LOCKING MECHANISM JAM BOLT -- ONE OR TWO

EXAMPLES BELOW


 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHIRLY JIG SPROCKET LOCK

8 position sure lock. Every 45 degrees, can be padlocked for safety.

Standard on all Pro models, optional on all other models.

EXAMPLE BELOW

 

 

BALANCE ADJUSTMENT -- BRACKETS

Until Whirly Jig® hit the market in 1992, all rotisseries used long, gangly brackets to adjust balance. Some still do.

Note crossbar welded to the rotating axis.

EXAMPLES BELOW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BALANCE ADJUSTMENT -- CROSS BAR WITH RIGID BRACKETS

Used first by Whirly Jig®. Others have followed the leader and are using an adjustable bar, but not AS adjustable.

EXAMPLE BELOW

 

For 12 years, Whirly Jig® Company has used a threaded balance adjuster for precision adjustment of center of gravity.  Now after buying two of our Whirly Jigs (a standard and a Pro), the Johnson City/Jonesborough rotisserie company dissected them to see why and how they worked.  Theirs now have a threaded adjuster.  We were informed of this by one of their employees at Lowes Motor Speedway in September 2003.

Whirly Jig® Company uses a spring-loaded lock pin into a 40 tooth sprocket for 40 position lock, every 9 to 90 degrees, plus an internal resistance control for when you need a firm resistance, but not locked.

Example Below

No one who has ever completed a course in mechanical engineering would put the lifting mechanism on one side of the base when the load is one the other side.  This is not conducive to easy raising or lowering and will always bind.  Add this to bases that are not parallel, and you compound the problem.

Examples Below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One welding shop has resorted to nylon rollers, top outside, bottom inside. Another shop has nylon sliders, again, top outside, bottom inside; as these are the pressure points when the lifting cylinders are IMPROPERLY PLACED.

EXAMPLES BELOW: 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the beginning, Whirly Jig® has recommended that all body restoration be done with body mounted to the frame, especially when sheet metal is being replaced while mounted to a rotisserie. This is the only way to assure body alignment. Now, after 15 years of showing a cut-up '57 Chevy on their Bottoms Up rotisserie without the frame for support, the, after acquiring two Whirly Jigs (along with the 30-page instructions and 1-hour video) has remounted the Chevy body to its original frame with a spacer system.

 

Whirly Jig® has been using it for over 12 years. Now you can buy from the innovator who understands how and why it works, or from the imitator who knows only what it does work. THE CHOICE IS YOURS!

Whirly Jig® System

Please read carefully

The pictures below show an angle finder on the vertical post of the Whirly Jig and the brackets to the body with the body both top side up and bottom side up.  The angle finder readings show no lean of the vertical post or sag of the brackets to the body, with the brackets remaining on the same plane throughout the smooth 360° rotation. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We Are The Leader In Auto Body Rotisseries!